Differentiating for Multiple Intelligences: A Study of Students’ Understandings Through the Use of Aesthetic Representations

  • Courtney Lambert Crim Trinity University
  • Jenifer Salter Thornton University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Kimberley Kennedy Cuero University of Texas at San Antonio

Abstract

This study intersects Multiple Intelligences, differentiated instruction, and aesthetic representations. During three semesters, 122 preservice teachers created aesthetic representations as the culminating project for a teacher preparation courses. Guiding research questions were: (1) How do students perceive the alignment between their aesthetic representations and their self-identified strongest area(s) of Multiple Intelligences? (2) In what ways does the use of aesthetic representations support the components of a differentiated classroom? Results indicate that students in this study overwhelmingly gravitate to areas of Multiple Intelligence strength(s). Additionally, findings suggest meaningful choice, critical thinking, and personal validations support student learning. Participants deepened their understandings of course content and experienced how differentiation can increase student success, honor modes of self-expression, and authenticate individual learning styles.

Author Biographies

Courtney Lambert Crim, Trinity University
Department of Education Assistant Professor of Education
Jenifer Salter Thornton, University of Texas at San Antonio
Assistant Professor of Early Childhood and Elementary Education Department of Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching College of Education and Human Development
Kimberley Kennedy Cuero, University of Texas at San Antonio
Associate Professor of Literacy Department of Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching College of Education and Human Development
Published
2013-11-01
Section
Articles